Tag Archives: New Employee

Leadership Should Focus on 6 Steps to Great Employee Selection

MINA TINDLE.

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New employee selection is an important business move for every leader. Hiring the right candidate can be a bit of a mystery if leadership does not have a good idea of what they are really looking for. It is essential to have a structured process that clearly lays out what you are looking for and what a suitable candidate can bring to your team. If you go into the hiring process without a thought to culture, purpose and fit then it is a near certainty that you will hire someone ill-suited for the position. Chris Young discusses six steps that will enhance your hiring process to help you make better employee selections. 

Step 1: Commit to hiring the best talent possible – every time. Committed managers do whatever it takes…  They commit to carefully hiring the very best talent possible.  They commit to studying the performance difference between top and bottom talent.  Committed managers do not rush the employee selection process because they know the costs of getting it wrong are high.  
Step 2: Do not rush the employee selection process. All too often I see a sales manager who is tired of hiring low performing sales people who says, “I am tired of the headaches.  I will do what it takes – I will wait until all steps are taken and the right candidate is found.”  Then they need a sales person next week and they rush the employee selection process.  Within weeks, they regret rushing the process because the new hire is not the ideal candidate.  Take the time necessary to hire the best possible talent.  
Step 3: Partner With Stakeholders. As a manager, it is your job to get results.  The best possible talent will help you get there.  Identifying and hiring the best possible talent requires partnership and the most important partnership is with HR. 
I have a “love-hate relationship” with HR.  Some HR professionals are incredibly intelligent and some are incredibly…  less intelligent.   
Whether your HR person is brilliant or not – you need to partner with them.  You cannot do it alone nor can you work against them.  You need HR and/or at least an external recruitment firm to help you with the employee selection process.        

…More at 6 Steps to Better Employee Selection

Employee selection is vital to your business and every leader needs to have hiring experience. Leaders are best-suited to know the strengths and weaknesses of your teams. This makes being able to think critically and truly examine what your team needs of paramount importance in the hiring process. There are many factors to consider when selecting new employees and you are in the best position to notice whether a candidate is going to work out. Consider the six steps above and try integrating them into your employee selection process. Employee selection is one of the most important moves a leader can make for his or her company. 

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Hire People That Fit Your Company Culture

Welcome to the train

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It is important for every hiring manager to hire people that fit your company's culture. Leadership will initially be responsible for implementing key components of company culture with their first hires and will continue to help shape it over time. Everyone at a company should fit into the culture and believe in the basic tenets of the culture. Hiring good people is a major driver of your success and a fundamental way of making or breaking a business. Elad Gil writes more about his experience with company culture and hiring the right people to fit.

Your company culture is the foundation on which everything you do rests.  Your culture acts as an unwritten set of rules that drives behavior and cohesion across the company.

Cohesive, insular cultures are more resilient and can withstand shocks to it (e.g. pivoting multiple times) as well as can be extremely motivational / draw out the best in people (e.g. engineers at Palintir sleeping under their desks in their belief they are helping national security, the emergence of Google's “don't be evil” doctrine).

…More at Elad Blog: Never, Ever Compromise: Hiring For Culture Fit

It is necessary for every potential employee to understand what a company's culture is before being hired. Those doing the hiring will need to be keen observers in order to ensure that new employees are the right fit. It is impossible not to notice when a person is not right for a job and does not fit in well. A strong belief in the company culture and a positive attitude are great indicators that a candidate holds potential. There are many ways to engage a potential new employee and more than one approach should help to safeguard against bad hires. Always keep in mind that company culture is an important consideration when hiring new people for your company. 

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Good Leaders Welcome New Employees

The shark

Image by Miguel Pires da Rosa via Flickr

If your company is growing and you need more employees it is a good idea to have a schedule and checklist in place to get that new employee comfortable and integrated into their new working environment as soon as possible. Good leaders will make sure that a new employee gets acquainted with everyone in the company (or at least every department).

A new employee will be nervous about what to do and what the expectations are for them so ensuring a smooth first day is critical in the integration process. Katie Morell writes about onboarding new employees and what to do before, during and after the new hire's first day.

On the First Day

  • Complete paperwork. The minute the new hire walks in the door, Meyer recommends going over the employee manual and finishing any necessary paperwork.
  • Meet with mentor. After the paperwork is finished, usher them into a conference room or out to lunch to meet with their mentor. Leave the room and let them talk amongst themselves, Meyer suggests.
  • Execute one-on-one meetings with team members. Organize 15-minute meetings with each person in the company, she adds. This works best with small companies of less than 20 people (Digital Talent Agents employs around 15 people). Instruct team members to explain what they do and how it relates to the new employee’s position. “Our new hires tell us that this is their favorite part of their first day because it gives them a basic understanding of what is going on from all parts of the company,” says Meyer.
  • Take them to lunch or coffee. Continue the meeting theme by personally taking them to a one-on-one lunch. If this is impossible on the first day, slot it in for the first week or 10 days.
  • Give them something to do. New hires are eager to contribute as soon as possible, says Regan.

“People feel horrible when they are just sitting around, not sure what to do,” he notes. “We try to get them working on something, even if it is something small, as quickly as possible.”

…More at The Essential Onboarding Checklist

Everyone hates paperwork so it is best to get that out of the way first. Nothing helps a new team member more than getting some one-on-one face time with their new team. Allowing a new hire to forge connections with their new team is invaluable for leaders seeking to develop strong teams. The best thing that a new hire can do is work. Often times new hires are very excited on their first day and will relish any task given to them so leaders need to ensure that some project is planned so they don't languish and waste all that energy. 

 

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